Presser Feet Cheat Sheet


Back in the 20s and such times when sewing machines only sewed a straight stitch, they came with a selection of attachments instead. There were surprisingly many. They didn't call them presser feet though, they called them attachments. The only one that was called a presser foot was the straight stitch foot.


Some of those old, antique attachments are now manufactured to fit modern sewing machines better, but some have (sadly) been left in the past or "updated" (sigh, still not the same).

For now, let's look at some of the more popular (and handier) presser feet and attachments made for our modern sewing machines.

These are standard presser feet. This kind of foot has quite a few names: the standard foot, zigzag foot, universal presser foot, all-purpose foot, and general purpose presser foot. It doesn't really matter what you call it unless you are buying one and have to tell the salesperson or search engine. It has a wide needle hole that fits the widest stitch on your sewing machine.

In case you are wondering what that little black button is, it's a foot leveller. If you are starting sewing a seam on thick fabric, you push that button in before you lower the presser foot and it holds the presser foot level. When the hole foot is supported by the fabric, the button will pop out again. It works only with the shank that has a hole in the right place for the pin on the button, so if it didn't come with your sewing machine, it probably won't work on it.

This is a two-sided zipper foot. It snaps onto your sewing machine like any other snap-on presser foot, but instead of snapping on in the centre, you snap it onto either the left or the right side of the centre of the foot. It lets you get closer to what you are sewing than you can get with the standard presser foot. The one in the picture is the one that came with my Brother Sewing Machine.





Singer Low-shank Snap-on Blindhem Foot 10400-LThis is an adjustable Blind-hem foot. You turn that little wheel on the right-hand side to move the white guide left or right. The fold of the fabric buts against the guide and the machine sews a blind hem, catching just a little of the fold in the swing of the stitch. There are instructions for machine sewing a blind hem on this blog.

Distinctive Overlock Overcast Sewing Machine Presser Foot - Fits All Low Shank Snap-On Singer*, Brother, Babylock, Viking (Husky Series), Euro-Pro, Janome, Kenmore, White, Juki, Bernina (Bernette Series), New Home, Necchi, Elna and More!This is an overcasting foot, also called an over-locking foot even though it is for a sewing machine and not for an overlocker/serger. There is a metal guide against which you butt the edge of the fabric. Using a zigzag stitch or any other overcasting stitch on your sewing machine that will fit, you neaten the raw edge to prevent it from fraying. When I say "that will fit" I mean that won't have the needle hit the guide of the foot on its way down.

If your sewing machine's zigzag stitch is centerised as opposed to being always aligned to the right, this foot is essential for overcasting because you can't use the sewing machine needle plate as a guide on such a sewing machine.



Distinctive Satin Stitch Sewing Machine Presser Foot - Fits All Low Shank Snap-On Singer*, Brother, Babylock, Viking (Husky Series), Euro-Pro, Janome, Kenmore, White, Juki, Bernina (Bernette Series), New Home, Simplicity, Necchi, Elna and More!This is a satin-stitch foot, also called a monogramming foot, and possibly an embroidery stitch foot. It looks very like a standard presser foot, except it may be wider and it has a deeper tunnel underneath for the denser stitching to go through smoothly. If you tried satin stitching with your standard presser foot, the fabric might not feed through because the stitches wouldn't fit under your standard presser foot. It would be like trying to get a lorry under a too-low bridge.

It is to be used for decorative stitches only, and not sewing seams because, due to the higher tunnel; I don't think it will hold the fabric down against the needle plate flat enough.

Back when sewing machines usually did only a straight stitch, they invented a zigzag attachment. You could put different cams on top of the Singer one and they would sew different decorative stitches.
http://www.april1930s.com/html/singer_adjustable_zigzag_attac.html
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hgHQW38MWYE&feature=related


Distinctive Button Sewing Machine Presser Foot - Fits All Low Shank Snap-On Singer*, Brother, Babylock, Husqvarna Viking (Husky Series), Euro-Pro, Janome, Kenmore, White, Juki, Bernina (Bernette Series), New Home, Simplicity, Necchi, Elna and More!This is a button-sewing foot. You use it with the feed dogs down or covered because you want the fabric and the button to stay put.

It goes on your sewing machine with the blue end facing you and the button underneath. Then you set your sewing machine at a zigzag stitch whose width lets the needle go down the holes on the button. If you want to have a thread shank on the button, you put a matchstick or something like that on top of the button between the holes. That makes the stitches take more thread. When you have finished stitching the button on, you leave long thread tails, bring them under the button and wrap them around the threads. Then you bring them to the back of your fabric and tie them off.


These are buttonhole feet. The small one (called a sliding buttonhole foot) is for a four-step buttonhole and the bigger one (called an automatic buttonhole foot) is for a 1-step buttonhole.

With the sliding buttonhole foot you have to measure the button and make the buttonhole in 4-steps on your sewing machine. You cannot use this foot on a sewing machine that makes a 1-step buttonhole.

With the automatic buttonhole foot, you just fit your button in the gauge at the back of the foot, lower the presser foot, and pull down the buttonhole lever on your sewing machine. It is important to raise the lever after every buttonhole and pull it down when the presser foot is down because if you don't you may not get good buttonholes - one side will be shorter than the other.

There are a few other kinds of buttonhole feet, like the Bernina Buttonhole foot and the Janome Long-Buttonhole Foot, but your instruction manual, manufacturer's website or the manufacturer by telephone should tell you more about them if you have them.

In the old days they made an attachment called a buttonholer. It was like an extra machine that attached to your sewing machine. They could also be used to make satin stitches on a straight stitch sewing machine! Apparently you can you them on modern sewing machines but get better results on the vintage kind they were made for. http://www.april1930s.com/html/singer_buttonholer.html

Distinctive Concealed Invisible Zipper Sewing Machine Presser Foot - Fits All Low Shank Snap-On Singer*, Brother, Babylock, Viking (Husky Series), Euro-Pro, Janome, Kenmore, White, Bernina (Bernette Series), New Home, Simplicity, Elna and More!This is a concealed zipper foot, also called an invisible zipper foot. An invisible zip is different to an ordinary zip in that the chain is on the inside; they are also curled up. When you sew it on you have to get into the groove and stitch it onto the stitching line of your garment. The foot has two tunnels underneath for the coils to travel under. The foot uncurls them as you go, making the job a lot easier than it would be if you were to put an invisible zip in with an ordinary zipper foot or an adjustable zipper foot.
I haven't yet put in an invisible zip but there are videos on YouTube of how to do insert one.

This is an adjustable zipper foot, also called an adjustable piping foot or an all purpose zipper foot. This one is from Hemline and is in our shop in Hornsea for £3.50, but most sewing machine manufacturers make them.
The bar on the right is where the slide is. This controls how far left or right the foot is - hence adjustable zipper foot. Make sure you tighten the screw on the bar as far as you can or the foot will move forward when you lower it and will cover the needlehole. For some reason, the stitch automatically shortens by about 0.5mm unless you have stablizer or something top and bottom.
It is essential for sewing piping that won't fit under the two-sided zipper foot, e.g. welting in soft-furnishings.
This is actually a really old invention. They made them for the old Singers, you know. http://www.april1930s.com/html/narrow_zipper_cording_foot_att.html


Distinctive Free-Motion Darning Quilting Sewing Machine Presser Foot - Fits All Low Shank Singer, Brother, Babylock, Viking (Husky Series), Euro-Pro, Janome, Kenmore, White, Juki, Bernina (Bernette Series), New Home, Simplicity, Elna and More!This is a Free-motion Darning foot. It has a spring on it that works in unison with the needle; when your needle goes down, so does the presser foot, when the needle goes up, the presser foot is above your fabric so that you can move it around as you wish, even though the presser foot lever is down.
You use this foot with the feed dogs down or covered.
To darn with it, you put the fabric in a hoop and sew back and forth across the rip and then left to right across it in a thread colour-matched to the fabric.
It looks a lot like the Free-motion Embroidery foot except that the bottom of the foot is a whole shape, and the one on the Free-motion embroidery foot is open-toe, i.e. it has a gap at the front.
They had these for antique sewing machines as well. I wonder if any of our attachments are new ideas?
http://www.april1930s.com/html/singer_featherweight_222k_embr.html
I think a free-motion quilting foot is probably tougher for heavier weights of quilting.

Brother SA184 Edge Joining Foot
This is an edge joining foot. It has a metal guide down the centre. It is used to join edges, and you can also use it as a guide for top-stitching near edges, and for making pin tucks.
To use it to join edges you have one piece of fabric with its edge on the left-hand side of the guide, and another piece of fabric with its edge against the right-hand side of the guide.
If you would like to see the antique version of this foot and how it's used, take a look at this website: http://www.april1930s.com/html/singer_edge_stitcher_attachmen.html
Personally, I rather like the antique version. You could still make pin-tucks with it. I wonder if they made the new kind to take thicker fabrics?

I have found a foot almost exactly like the antique one, but manufactured now! It is part of a set at Amazon.com. I'm not sure whether they are available in the UK, though. http://www.amazon.com/Distinctive-Rolled-Hemmer-EdgeStitcher-Package/dp/B0035UU8VI/ref=pd_sbs_ac_4

Distinctive 1-4 (Quarter Inch) Quilting Sewing Machine Presser Foot with Edge Guide - Fits All Low Shank Snap-On Singer*, Brother, Babylock, Husqvarna Viking (Husky Series), Euro-Pro, White, Bernina (Bernette Series), New Home, Elna and More!

This is called a Quarter Inch Quilting Foot. This one has a metal guide along the right-hand side to keep your fabric aligned. The little notches on the left-hands side are so that you can pivot and keep the seams equal.






Distinctive Shirring Gathering Sewing Machine Presser Foot - Fits All Low Shank Singer, Brother, Babylock, Viking (Husky Series), Euro-Pro, Janome, Kenmore, White, Juki, Bernina (Bernette Series), New Home, Necchi, Elna and More!This is a gathering foot. The longer your stitch, the more gathered your fabric will be. The fabric you put underneath your gathering foot is the fabric that will be gathered. There is a slot for you to put another piece of fabric through. The fabric in the slot won't gather. This is so that you can make a gathered piece of fabric and sew it to a flat one at the same time.

You can do that with a Ruffler foot, but the gathering foot is cheaper (because it does less and is easier for them to make).

Brother SA109 1/4 Inch Binding FootThis is a binding foot. It works kind of like a bias binding maker in that it curls the fabric into the right shape as you go. The advantage is that it sews the binding to the edge at the same time. There are different sizes available for different sizes of binding. The size refers to how wide the binding will be when folded in half and stitched onto your fabric, so it's half the size of the bias binding.

Distinctive Tape Binding Sewing Machine Presser Foot - Fits All Low Shank Snap-On Singer*, Brother, Babylock, Viking (Husky Series), Euro-Pro, Janome, Kenmore, White, Juki, Bernina (Bernette Series), New Home, Simplicity, Necchi, Elna and More!
If you have already pressed your bias binding or if you bought it ready-made, you may prefer the Adjustable Bias-binder Foot, which is also called a taping foot. It can take various widths of bias binding and tapes. It won't curl the binding for you, but that is already done if you have purchased binding or if you have used a bias binding maker.

You can see the little wheel in the lower right-hand corner of the picture. That moves a guide inside the plastic bit of the foot to keep the binding in place as you sew it to your fabric.

Hemmer Feet Set 4mm and 6mm fits most snap-on machines (200326001) - (200081104)These are hemmer feet. They come in various widths and take a bit of practice to use. You can use them to make a narrow rolled hem on your sewing machine. The narrower ones are for fine fabrics like chiffons and silky fabrics, but you can use the much wider ones (e.g. 3cm) for medium weight fabrics like ordinary cottons and so on. I don't know about heavier/thicker fabrics.

There are variations of these feet such as the picot edge feet with which you use a zigzag stitch or an over-casting stitch with higher-than-usual upper tension. It is supposed to bring the edge of the fabric up a bit so that when you have the fabric flat, there is a picot edge. There is also the felling foot which allows you to more easily make seams like those on the back of your jeans (felled seams).

Distinctive Premium Even Feed Walking Sewing Machine Presser Foot with BONUS! Quilt GuideThis is a walking foot, also called an Even Feed Foot. How does it work? Well, you know how your sewing machine has feed dogs that push the fabric through? Well, sometimes when you are sewing several layers of fabric, such as in quilting, the top layer doesn't go through at the same speed as the bottom one because it has nothing to push it through simultaneously. This means that when you get to the end of your seam, looks like one piece of fabric is longer than the other.
That is where the Walking Foot come in. It has some 'feed dogs' in it that push the upper layer through so that both layers go through at the same rate, hence even feed.
There is also an open-toe version of this foot so that you can more easily see where you are stitching.
If you have a Pfaff with Integral Dual Feed, you don't need one of these; your sewing machine will do it for you. The same is true if you have a Janome Horizon.
The stick-thing that is next to the foot in the photo (that looks like a shepherds crook) is a seam guide. You slide the bar of it through the correct part on your shank, and the hook bit, which is at a right angle to the bar, works like the stitching guides on your needle plate, but you can adjust how far it is from your needle. This doesn't always come with your Walking Foot, and may be available separately.

Distinctive Pintuck Sewing Machine Presser Foot - Fits All Low Shank Snap-On Singer*, Brother, Babylock, Viking (Husky Series), Euro-Pro, Janome, Kenmore, White, Juki, Bernina (Bernette Series), New Home, Simplicity, Necchi, Elna and More!This is a Pin-tuck Foot. You use is with a twin needle. There are tunnels underneath that make the pin tucks. The guides also help to keep your twin-needle pin-tucks parallel. If you put a strand of cord underneath your stitching the pin-tuck you are stitching, you can make corded pin-tucks. Some sewing machines have guides available for the cord.

There are a few different pin-tuck feet with different sizes of tunnels and different numbers of tunnels.


Cording Foot
This is a cording foot. Can you see the little tunnels on the top in front? They are for the cords to go through. I think on this one you can 'clip' them in by sliding them under the little sticky-up bit at the side of the tunnels.

You can use this foot to sew over a number of cords at once and have them all be parallel.

There are different cording feet available for different quantities of cords.



Singer Quantum Double Welting Foot P60490This is a welting foot. It is a bit like an invisible zipper foot except that the tunnels are bigger underneath (it looks like a toad-in-the-hole with the sausages removed). You can use it to sew right up close to the welting (which is like thicker cording).





I would like to include more feet in this post, but there are so many I can't fit them in in time, sorry. If there is a particular sewing machine foot or attachment you would like information on, please leave a comment and I'll try to help you! : )

Comments

  1. Thank you so much for this info, it's the most comprehensive and easy to read that I have found.

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    1. Thank you so much for the info, but I would like to know further if I can use a picot edging needle & get the stitch using my old Singer 1288 sewing machine. If yes, that will be great news. Where can I purchase the accessories, meaning (foot & needle) Thank you

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    2. Do you mean a wing needle? I should think you can use any home sewing wing needle in your machine, as long as you check that the needle does not hit the stitch plate when it goes down, as it will if your stitch is set too wide.

      As for the accessories, you can get lots of accessories at this website if you are in the UK:
      http://sewingparts.co.uk/machines/singer-1288.html

      Otherwise I think generic skew-on feet will fit your machine, but you can ask the shop you want to buy from.

      As for the stitch, I think you could use a blind-hem or overcasting stitch to do the picot edge.

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  2. What a great post on presser feet. I am wondering if you know of a snap on even feed walking foot. I have a Janome 7318 Magnolia Machine, and it uses snap on feet.

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    1. I seem to remember seeing one somewhere on the Internet, but I can't find it now. I have a Janome Rotary Even Feed Foot set. It's great. It compensates for my sewing machine not having adjustable foot pressure in that it lets me sew single layers of cotton.

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  3. My machine has snap n feet, but I have to take off the shank and screw on the walking foot where the shank is normally screwed on. You may look iinto this possibility for our Janome.

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  4. Thanks for sharing these awesome tips!

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  5. thanks for this very helpful tutorial!

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  6. Excellent post. Thank you.

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  7. Thanx! Now my list of wants is MUCH higher! ;)

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  8. Thank you...just received a package of pressure feet in an order and it had no description or instructions! Needed this so bad! Louise Willard

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  9. Very educational, Thank you.

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  10. I'm having issues with my straight stitch pressure foot. To sew my needle always goes to the left even if I have it set on straight stitch not left straight stitch. Is it okay to use the zig zag foot to straight stitch? If I don't the needle will break on the other pressure foot.

    If not could you tell me maybe what I'm doing wrong?

    Thank you!

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    1. You don't need a straight stitch foot, I don't have one. Many sewing machines do not come with them. If you are sewing delicate fabric, you can just put tissue paper underneath it to stop it going into the feed dogs.

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  11. Thanx for the mini education you have given. A world of presser feet info now lies before me thnx to you

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  12. very informative . thanx, i have singer talent 3321.. i want to know whether presser foot supplied with jenome stich magic will fit into my machine....

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    1. I couldn't say; I had never heard of Janome Stitch Magic until today. I think it must be an Indian thing, if Google is anything to go by.

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    2. thanx any ways...i get a little confused with the names of stiches on instruction manuals and on the machine...do you have a list of names of stiches and their pictures,

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    3. Here is one that I wrote this morning:
      http://thesewingcorner.blogspot.co.uk/2013/01/what-
      does-this-stitch-do.html

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  13. nice post, very informative :-)

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  14. Do you have to use name brand presser feet on a babylock sofia 2. they are hard to find and pretty costly. Can I purchase one of the generic sets so that I have a variety at a affordable price?

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  15. I think you can use them. You can certainly use the Brother feet for 7mm-stitch, top-loading bobbin machines because Brother and Babylock sewing machines are the same. The only concern with generic feet is the needle hole: is it wide enough, and if so, is it curved for the top-loading bobbin? If you keep your stitch width narrow enough, or keep the needle in a safe position you should be fine.

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  16. hi, great information. i'm about to purchase the brother LB6800 & wanted to get additional presser feet. was wondering if you have any advice for a basic package to make work easier as there's so many feet available.

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    1. You don't need to purchase additional feet to get the job done. I think it's a matter of personal preference whether they make jobs easier or harder (personally, I like using basic feet and sewing carefully when I need to).

      Given the price of the Brother LB6800, I feel I should warn you that I have found out that _my_ Brother sewing machine was what is called a "disposable sewing machine". I don't know if this applies to the higher-priced ones. It means that the insides parts are stuck onto the case instead of being on a sort of metal skeleton. If you are an occaisional sewist, this may not bother you, but if you a heavy duty sewist I would suggest looking at a different make (all going well, I am about to get a Bernina 380; no embroidery, but quality sewing).

      If you have your heart set on the Brother machine, I would suggest getting a pack of Madeira stabliser for the embroidery. There are starter packs available with a variety of different stablisers in them.

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  17. hi, what is difference between janome acufeed ruffle presser foot, janome ultimate ruffler presser foot. do they look the same ?can janome acufeed ruffler foot be used on janome stichmagic?

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    1. I can't see the difference in the photos (they may be the same photo) I would think the acufeed ruffler would be wider and have a space at the back for the acufeed thing on the machine. The acufeed ruffler wouldn't fit on the StitchMagic; only on machines with acufeed.

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  18. but acufeed rufller is fitting on stichmagic.....

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    1. Do you mean the feet fit, or that StitchMagic has the acufeed feature? I think it would be best to ask Janome your question. Sorry I can't help more.

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  19. Very nice and helpful information has been given in this article. I like the way you explain the things. Keep posting. Thanks!
    Sewing Machines

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  20. I have procured janome binding foot. I wanted an information on how to use it. I mean if I cut tape (strips ) myself can I bind it on edge of another fabric or I have to properly fold it and make proper tape to bind it neatly...

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    1. Here are a couple of tutorials for using a binder attachment:

      http://thehabygoddess.blogspot.co.uk/2010/06/using-binder-foot-attachment.html

      http://thevintageseamstress.blogspot.co.uk/2011/02/how-to-use-vintage-binder-attachment.html

      I think it will take a bit of practice to get good at using hte binder attachment. I hope these bloggers' tutorials help! :)

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  21. Thanks this was very helpful to me.

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  22. hi, I have purchased janome dream maker 120. this is also sold under the name janome 4120 QDC and janome txl 607.. I want to know whether I can use schmetz triple needle..2.5 /3.0 mm in this machine ..

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  23. hi, I have purchased janome dream maker 120. this is also sold under the name janome 4120 QDC and janome txl 607.. I want to know whether I can use schmetz triple needle..2.5 /3.0 mm in this machine ..

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  24. Thank you so much for this comprehensive list of presser feet.
    Is there anything about twin gripping feet with guide you could tell us? I try to find one in Japan but find what it can be called!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi,
      I think you mean a "walking foot" or an "even feed foot".

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  25. Sorry for the mishap.. I try to find one in Japan but cannot guess how it is called here.

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  26. lot of info on feet very helpful but I have a mystery foot it has a D shaped hole for the needle and a small pin hole to the left in front underneath it has two shallow channels in front and a wide channel at the back first instincts says it could be a cording foot but and here's the mystery it has an adjustable gauge behind the foot running front to back marked in centimetre's up to 3cm anyone with ideas

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm as puzzled as you are. I've searched online and I couldn't find anything matching your description. Can you upload a photo on Burdastyle in the forum? Maybe someone there would know what it is.

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    2. I've had a thought: maybe it's a manual buttonhole foot, with the ruler at the back to get the right size buttonhole, and the channels are for the beads of the buttonholes.

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  27. I have a heavy duty Consew machines, I will like to know the name of the attachment to hold four presser foot simultaneously.

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    1. Sorry, that sounds like an industrial machine. I don't really know about those.

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  28. I have an elderly Viking Rose (600 Series) which uses snap-on presser feet. The presser feet are so expensive I was wondering if I could use another brand. Does anyone know? And, if so, what brand. Thank you very much.

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  29. I recently bought a Singer Quantum Stylist Computerized and Quilting machine. I was wondering if the Quantum 340 and the Quantum Futura CE200 pressure feet would fit on my Singer Quantum Stylist. All the machines have a low shank. I would really appreciate. your help.

    Thanks

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    1. I can't find the Singer Quantum 340 online so I don't know if they take the same feet. If it's a modern machine you might be able to use the same feet. You could email Singer from their website.

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  30. can you suggest any folder that automatically make corner with bias binder.

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  31. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  32. hello, thank you very much for this post its very helpful. i have a question i have recently got a singer talent 3321... and i am trying to make a round shape stitch ( my English is not very good). lets say i am trying to sew a circle on a square and the fabric just wont move around.. i have tried the satin stitch foot and still nothing...its so tight that it will only move forward.. do i have to buy another foot.? can u please help me ...

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    1. If you mean a scallop stitch - it looks like this symbol ) - it won't turn the fabric for you. It's best to sew one full ) and then with the needle down, lift the presser foot, turn the fabric yourself, lower the presser foot and sew another ).

      It you mean sew a curve with straight stitches, you have to turn the fabric yourself. You will find it helpful to stop every so often and, with the needle down, raise the presser foot, turn the fabric as much as you need to, then lower the presser foot and continue sewing. You have to do this little and often to make a curve.

      Don't worry about your English. I'm learning French and that's hard enough! :)

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  33. I have a puzzler for you. How do you trick a computerized sewing machine into thinking it has thread in the needle so you can create a template, on paper, by punching holes all along the design on the paper?

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    1. Just leave the thread out. Unless you're talking about embroidery machines; I don't have one of those so I don't know. : )

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  34. Thank you for the information. I recently purchased an old Singer Redeye 66 with several boxes of feet and attachments that look like pieces from outer space. You've shown me what many are.

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  35. hi sabrina
    i have a usha bandhan straight sewing machine tell me presser foot in these type of machine can change for sew zip and piping. presser foot whose sew piping can attached in machine

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    1. I don't know about all different kinds of sewing machines, so I found this link:
      http://www.ushainternational.com/Products/sewing-machines/#!/subcat15
      Perhaps they will be able to help you if you email them.
      Good luck. : )

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  36. Just tonight found your site! I will definitely be visiting often as have just
    started sewing again ; am very rusty but did get my machine serviced and am having issues sewing a dog leash. Guttemann thread keeps breaking so out will come the manual. The above sewing foot info is the
    best I have ever seen and thank heavens for the internet.

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  37. I don't know which machine you have, but somewhere on your machine you should find a "needle position" lever. Usually you will use this to change the size of a zig zag stitch.

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  38. Awesome!Thank you so much! Very informative indeed!

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  39. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  40. Hi I have a brother machine all going well, bottom spool ran out and now needle is missing hole and hitting the pressure foot. can you help. Nearly finished the christmas decorations.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The only thing I can suggest is that you get your sewing machine serviced, or look for a new one. This is what happened with my Brother sewing machine, except I put that down to my having tried servicing it myself. :)

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  41. For all the beginners who are planning to buy a sewing machine, here are some tips to consider before purchasing the right sewing machine for you. First, you have to consider the simplicity of operation. A sewing machines that is simple to use in your level of experience will set as a training platform to improve your skills in sewing. A user friendly sewing machine is what I offer you. Just visit our site at http://beginnersewingmachinehub.com

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  42. I am having an old USHA sewing machine,I want piping foot,zigzag foot and some othere more... Can i fit them to my sewing machine,if yes how can i do ? And where will i get these foot ? Please kindly help me ...

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    1. I think USHA are the Janome branch in India. They have a website:
      http://www.ushainternational.com/Products/sewing-machines/
      Maybe they can help you if you contact them.

      Delete
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